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Old 05-12-2012, 07:40 AM   #1
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Default Inspirational real life stories of Indians



Dear Myhifians (a new term I have introduced for MyHindiForum users),

It is my wish to bring to notice the amazing real life incidents/achievements of our people. My stand is that inspite of the problems facing our country, there are a lot of otherwise unheard stories that assure us that we will only get better as a country. Basically, what I mean is there are more good things happening in society than the bad ones.

So, I will post all good real life stories in this thread. I request all fellow myhifians to post the inspirational stories you hear about along with the source.
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Old 05-12-2012, 07:41 AM   #2
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Default Re: Inspirational real life stories of Indians

District Collector U. Sagayam of Madurai(TN)




On a hot summer afternoon, on Madurai’s busy main road, the district collector, U. Sagayam, saw a young man talking on a cellphone while riding a motorbike. He asked his driver to wave the man down, got down from his car and meted out instant punishment: plant 10 saplings within 24 hours. Somewhat unconventional justice, some might say. But that’s how Sagayam works.

‘Lanjam Thavirtthu, Nenjam Namartthu’ (Reject bribes, hold your head high), says a board hanging above Sagayam’s chair in his modest office. That’s the code he lives by, even if politicians are incensed they cannot bend him their way—he’s been transferred 18 times in the last 20 years—and has made enemies of both superiors and subordinates. “I know I sit under a dangerous slogan and probably alienate people,” he says. “But I have been the same Sagayam from Day 1. Standing up against corruption is not for a season. Nor is it a fad. It’s forever.”

Two years ago, as district collector of Namakkal, he voluntarily declared his assets: a bank balance of Rs 7,172 and a house in Madurai worth Rs 9 lakh. Once, when his baby daughter, Yalini, who had breathing problems, was suddenly taken ill, he did not have the Rs 5,000 needed for admitting her to a private hospital. At that time he was deputy commissioner (excise) in Coimbatore and there were 650 liquor licences to be given out. The going bribe for each was rumoured to be Rs 10,000.

Sagayam started cleaning up Madurai the minute he landed here. The main bus terminus at Mattuthavani looked more like a bazaar, with shops all over the bus-shelters and no waiting place for passengers. Even a police outpost had been turned into a shop. The system was well-oiled with haftas to local politicians and policemen. Sagayam quickly went through the rulebook, cited the relevant clauses and cleaned up the entire area. But didn’t it hit poor shopkeepers who lost their livelihood? “A violation is a violation,” says Sagayam, “but we will help them rehabilitate.” Nageshwaran, a taxi-driver and one of Sagayam’s many fans, says, “He’s strict and hasn’t taken even ten paise in bribe during his career. He’s like the upright collectors they show in some films, a real hero with integrity.”

Sagayam’s masters degrees in social work and law come in useful in his role as an administrator. He knows the rulebooks in detail and is not afraid of using them, however powerful the opponent. No wonder then that Sagayam’s career is marked with the scars of countless battles.

When he was in Kanchipuram as revenue officer, he took on the sand mafia, ordering them to stop dredging sand from the Palar riverbed. Large-scale dredging had made the area flood-prone. The mafia sent goons to assault Sagayam, but he did not budge and would not take back the order. He also took on a mighty soft-drink mnc when a consumer showed him a bottle with dirt floating in it. He sealed the bottling unit and banned the sale of the soft drink in the city. In Chennai, he locked horns with a restaurant chain and recovered four acres valued at some Rs 200 crore.

Given such credentials, it wasn’t surprising for him to be picked by the Election Commission to oversee elections in Madurai, as famous for its temples as its political gods. During the last polls, Sagayam took on M.K. Azhagiri, the local MP and son of former CM and DMK supremo M. Karunanidhi. He conducted voter awareness campaigns in colleges; the DMK petitioned the court twice, seeking to end what it said was an attempt to influence voters, but the court demurred.

Sagayam’s wife Vimala has stood by him all these years but she was rattled by some of the threats during the elections. “He always says if you are right, nobody can hurt you,” she says. “But sometimes it becomes difficult.”

Sagayam takes a hands-on approach to his work. He holds a Monday ‘durbar’, at which anyone can meet him with their complaints. During tours of the district for review meetings and inspections, he will suddenly stop a school bus to talk to children or duck into a school to take a class. When students tell him they want to be IAS or IPS officers, he asks, “It’s all well to say now that you’ll be honest, but will you remain unbending about not taking bribes throughout your career?”

Some months back, while driving to a village, he found a 92-year-old woman cleaning rice. She said she had to work in order to eat. He immediately sanctioned Rs 1,000 as old-age pension for her. When 60-year-old Vellamma met him during a tour of Uthappanaikkanoor village this week and asked him to grant her a pension, he said, “I can do that. But do you want me to send your son to jail too—for abandoning you?” He said it with a smile, as a joke, but he has in fact taken action against children who don’t take care of their aging parents.

“I believe, as Mahatma Gandhi said, that India lives in her villages,” says Sagayam, who also idolises Subhash Chandra Bose. His years as a collector—he has slept overnight in village schools many times—have convinced him to better the lot of villagers by strengthening the village administrative officer (VAO) system. Many VAOs have never visited villages and often stay miles away from where they should be, in cities. In Namakkal, his action against errant VAOs had them ganging up with politicians to get him transferred. Over 5,000 villagers protested, saying they wouldn’t let Sagayam go. The politicians had to retreat.

Sagayam says he learnt honesty on his mother’s knees. He is the youngest of four sons of a farmer from Pudukottai. “Our adjoining field had mango trees and my friends and I would pick the fallen fruit,” he says. “But my mother made me throw the mangoes away, saying I should enjoy only what is mine.” Now his daughter Yalini wants to become a collector. When she has an argument with her brother Arun, she asks her father, “Is he really your son? He just told a lie!” Both of them are proud of their father. Recently, after a long time, the Sagayam family went on a vacation to Kullu in Himachal Pradesh. While visiting a gurudwara, a stranger came up to their father and asked him, “Aren’t you IAS officer Mr Sagayam?” Yalini and Arun have not stopped beaming.

Source: http://www.outlookindia.com/article.aspx?277990
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मैं क़तरा होकर भी तूफां से जंग लेता हूं ! मेरा बचना समंदर की जिम्मेदारी है !!
दुआ करो कि सलामत रहे मेरी हिम्मत ! यह एक चिराग कई आंधियों पर भारी है !!
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Old 05-12-2012, 07:43 AM   #3
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Default Re: Inspirational real life stories of Indians

Uttam Teron, 34, Founder, Parijat Academy (Guwahati)




Seven years before the Right to Education Bill was introduced in the Parliament, Uttam Teron, a young man from Pamohi, 20 km from Guwahati, dreamt of 100 per cent literacy for the children of his village. Education was the lowest priority in this Karbi-dominated hamlet and most children, especially girls, helped their parents in the fields. This changed when Teron began the Parijat Academy in a cowshed in 2003 with just four students. Today, the school, with a small hostel, provides free education to 502 students of which 256 are girls. Uttam has shown great courage , determination and dedication to uplift these children from their helpless state and give them hope and happiness through education and a better way of life.

Seven years before the Right to Education Bill was introduced in the Parliament, Uttam Teron, a young man from Pamohi, 20 km from Guwahati, dreamt of 100 per cent literacy for the children of his village. Education was the lowest priority in this Karbi-dominated hamlet and most children, especially girls, helped their parents in the fields. This changed when Teron began the Parijat Academy in a cowshed in 2003 with just four students. Today, the school, with a small hostel, provides free education to 502 students of which 256 are girls. Uttam has shown great courage , determination and dedication to uplift these children from their helpless state and give them hope and happiness through education and a better way of life.

For most of us engrossed in the daily routine of balancing work and life, there is barely any time left to look around and feel the pain and suffering of the not so priviledged, the marginalized and the forgotten lot. Uttam Teron , Pradip Sarma , Father Lukose , Kaushik Das and Lanu Aimol are a few amongst us who have been able to make a difference in the lives of others and touch their lives in more ways than one.

Mahatma Gandhi had said, “You must be the change you want to see in the world.” There are very few people who, rather than crib about the way things are, dare to be the change they want to see in the world. It’s because of them that the world is a better and more meaningful place for all of us; especially for those whose lives have been touched and changed. The Guwahati Run & Walk is a tribute to these extraordinary individuals and I am proud and honored to participate in this unique event.

Source: http://assamfoundation.net/index.php...ends&Itemid=71
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मैं क़तरा होकर भी तूफां से जंग लेता हूं ! मेरा बचना समंदर की जिम्मेदारी है !!
दुआ करो कि सलामत रहे मेरी हिम्मत ! यह एक चिराग कई आंधियों पर भारी है !!
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Old 05-12-2012, 07:44 AM   #4
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Default Re: Inspirational real life stories of Indians

The Cleanest Village in Asia, is in India

When I first heard of Mawlynnong’s claim of being “The Cleanest Village in Asia”, I knew I had to plan a trip to see it. The village is at a distance of around 90 km from Shillong, and the road leading up to it has some of the most panoramic and breathtaking views in the country.

Nestled in the pristine East Khasi Hills of Meghalaya the residents of this picturesque village along the Indo-Bangla border have learnt to live at harmony with Mother Nature and might very well become an example that urban folk should emulate.

Till over a decade ago this village was practically unknown to tourists until Discover India magazine accorded it the Cleanest Village status in 2005. As one walks around the narrow zig-zagging paths of the village one is astounded by the clean well maintained black tarmac and the spotless front-yards and sidewalks of the bamboo stilt houses. There are stylish bamboo dustbins everywhere and separate compost pits in various pockets of the village for organic and inorganic wastes. Polythene use is completely banned and so is smoking.

There are public toilets which the villagers themselves maintain and everyone takes part in the ritual weeding, sweeping and cleaning of the gardens and roads which happens every evening. Even the children are taught from an early age to keep their surroundings clean and they don’t hesitate to pick up the odd piece of garbage on the road and put it in the bin. The village is well supplied with an efficient localized water supply and sanitation system.

Just outside the village on the passing river is situated the amazing living roots bridge which speaks out for the ingenuity of the people. It is over 200 years old and was constructed by tying the roots of two banyan trees and maneuvering them to get entangled in such a way as to create a passage over the stream. The Sky-view tower on the eastern side of the village is a tall structure built on the support of a tree with bamboos and gives a wonderful view of the Bangladesh plains.

For the discerning traveler there are many unmapped trails that one can explore around the village full of little waterfalls and sacred forests abounding in flora and fauna. The guest houses in the village are basic tree houses built on top of stilts that almost jut out into the adjacent forest. Staying in them is an experience in itself.

There is a lot urban society could learn from Mawlynnong and its environmentally conscious citizens. The self sustaining models though rudimentary have very strong foundations and have more to do with behavior and customs that the peoples have adhered to and upheld. With the increasing influx of tourists the challenge for Mawlynnong is to maintain its culture and also educate outsiders with their ways. Do you think modern cities in India can replicate what the citizens of Mawlynnong have done? With better technology and infrastructural support Indian cities can certainly take Mawlynnong’s concepts forward and create self sustaining environment systems with minimal damage to the eco-systems. All we need are more responsible and conscientious citizens who will take up the cause of the environment.

Mawlynnong can be reached by road and it is roughly a three hour drive from Meghalaya’s capital, Shillong. The nearest airport is Guwahati, in Assam, which is around three hours from Shillong and is well connected with major metros.

http://www.thebetterindia.com/4377/t...a-is-in-india/
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मैं क़तरा होकर भी तूफां से जंग लेता हूं ! मेरा बचना समंदर की जिम्मेदारी है !!
दुआ करो कि सलामत रहे मेरी हिम्मत ! यह एक चिराग कई आंधियों पर भारी है !!
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Old 05-12-2012, 07:45 AM   #5
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Default Re: Inspirational real life stories of Indians

Siddappa, an illiterate Farmer designs a Water Mill to generate Electricity (Somapur village, Karnataka)



Siddappa, an illiterate farmer from Somapur village in Gadag district of Karnataka, has designed a water mill to generate electricity. Right from conceptualizing to materialisation, the farmer has done everything on his own. He operates the water mill in the canal near his house.

Using timbers, Siddappa prepared a giant wheel that joined at a central hub. There are eight arms, five feet each, extending from the central hub. A plastic bucket is dangled at the tip of each arm. When the water from two pipes gushes into one of the buckets, it generates the pressure that turns the 10-feet wheel in an anti-clockwise motion. The bucket could also be spun in the horizontal plane using a central steering wheel, similar to a teacup ride. As one after another bucket is driven by the flowing water, the first arm declines back to the ground while the other rises in the air. This process spins the black wheel attached to this giant wheel. The spinning black wheel rotates another wheel connected to a dynamo.

A converter converts the Direct Current from the dynamo into Alternating Current. Siddappa claims to have spent a mere Rs 5000 on building the entire apparatus. This is his second attempt to show the villagers that anybody can produce electricity for self-consumption using the resources at hand. “Many people who have canals flowing near their villages don’t know how to use that natural gift. I want to show them all practically that electricity problems can be solved by being creative. There is no need to beg to the government for everything,” he says.

He gets 150 watts of power from this water mill when water flows in the canal. Siddappa claims he can create electricity for the entire village through his machine. But the problem is that the canal in his village flows only for three months a year!
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मैं क़तरा होकर भी तूफां से जंग लेता हूं ! मेरा बचना समंदर की जिम्मेदारी है !!
दुआ करो कि सलामत रहे मेरी हिम्मत ! यह एक चिराग कई आंधियों पर भारी है !!
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Old 05-12-2012, 07:45 AM   #6
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Default Re: Inspirational real life stories of Indians

Indian Man, Jadav Payeng, Single-Handedly Plants A 1,360 Acre Forest In Assam




An Indian man has single-handedly grown a sprawling forest on a 1,360 acre (550-hectare) sandbar in the middle of the Brahmaputra. It now has many endangered animals, including at least five tigers, one of which bore two cubs recently.

It all started way back in 1979 when floods washed a large number of snakes ashore on the sandbar. One day, after the waters had receded, Payeng , only 16 then, found the place dotted with the dead reptiles. That was the turning point of his life.

"The snakes died in the heat, without any tree cover. I sat down and wept over their lifeless forms. It was carnage . I alerted the forest department and asked them if they could grow trees there. They said nothing would grow there. Instead, they asked me to try growing bamboo. It was painful, but I did it. There was nobody to help me. Nobody was interested,"

Source: http://www.greatnewsnetwork.org/inde...rest_in_assam/
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मैं क़तरा होकर भी तूफां से जंग लेता हूं ! मेरा बचना समंदर की जिम्मेदारी है !!
दुआ करो कि सलामत रहे मेरी हिम्मत ! यह एक चिराग कई आंधियों पर भारी है !!
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Old 09-11-2015, 05:27 PM   #7
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Default Re: Inspirational real life stories of Indians

P Mohamed Ali’sblongs from a small village of Kerala i.e Tallakulam, in Southern India. Unlike most people who outgrow their past and never look back, he looked back and gifted his past a better future. Most of his work in helping the society revolve around educating people. He considers education to be the key to fulfilling a person’s dreams like he did his. He encouraged and supported the growth of education in both Oman and Kerala. Kerala is among India’s most literate states.

P Mohamed ali is now the richest Indian in Oman, with a company called Galfar which is the largest private employer, employing around 27000 plus people.


Last edited by rajnish manga; 09-11-2015 at 09:36 PM.
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